Sunday, 5 June 2016

BOOK REVIEW: The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins


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EVERYDAY THE SAME

Rachel catches the same commuter train every morning. She knows it will wait at the same signal each time, overlooking a row of back gardens. She’s even started to feel like she knows the people who live in one of the houses. ‘Jess and Jason’, she calls them. Their life – as she sees it – is perfect. If only Rachel could be that happy.

UNTIL TODAY

And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough.

Now everything’s changed. Now Rachel has a chance to become a part of the lives she’s only watched from afar.

Now they’ll see; she’s much more than just the girl on the train…


BOOK REVIEW:- 
The story revolves around Rachel,the main character of the book.She daily used to travel by same train.Her mother used to tell her that I had an overactive imagination.
Something comforting about the sight of strangers safe at home.
She used to keep a watch on that house, Jason and Jess are the couples who used to live there.

He is dark-haired and well built, strong, protective, kind. He has a great laugh. She is one of those tiny bird-women, a beauty, pale-skinned with blond hair cropped short. She has the bone structure to carry that kind of thing off, sharp cheekbones dappled with a sprinkling of freckles, a fine jaw.

Rachel is too self-conscious. She don’t see Jason quite so much, he’s away a lot with work.

There are familiar faces on the trains, people She sees every week, going to and fro.She recognize them and they probably recognize her. She don’t know whether they see her, though, for what She really is.

Something unpleasant and unusual things used to happens.The incidents that take place can be predicted from these lines :-
Someone’s coming.
Someone is speaking to me. Now look.
Now look what you made me do.

“I have lost control over everything, even the places in my head.”

She’s buried beneath a silver birch tree, down towards the old train tracks, her grave marked with a cairn. Not more than a little pile of stones, really. I didn’t want to draw attention to her resting place, but I couldn’t leave her without remembrance. She’ll sleep peacefully there, no one to disturb her, no sounds but birdsong and the rumble of passing trains.

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Quotes From The Book :-
“Hollowness: that I understand. I'm starting to believe that there isn't anything you can do to fix it. That's what I've taken from the therapy sessions: the holes in your life are permanent. You have to grow around them, like tree roots around concrete; you mold yourself through the gaps”

“The holes in your life are permanent. You have to grow around them, like tree roots around concrete; you mould yourself through the gaps.” 


“I can’t do this, I can’t just be a wife. I don’t understand how anyone does it—there is literally nothing to do but wait. Wait for a man to come home and love you. Either that or look around for something to distract you.” 

THIS IS A BRILLIANT PIECE OF WORK. I WOULD GIVE THIS BOOK 5 OUT OF 5 STARS.WISH TO READ MORE BOOKS LIKE THIS.


ABOUT PAULA HAWKINS
Paula Hawkins worked as a journalist for fifteen years before turning her hand to fiction.


Born and brought up in Zimbabwe, Paula moved to London in 1989 and has lived there ever since. The Girl on the Train is her first thriller.

1 comment:

  1. I must recommend reading The Girl on the Train: A Novel.
    I finished reading it today, and my conclusion is that its a really interesting book.

    I brought mine off Amazon and I got it in only two days.
    Here's a link for the book on Amazon:
    http://amzn.to/2bmQFNj

    ReplyDelete